Toothaches: Cause, Remedies and Long-term Solutions

If you have ever held your head in agony through a toothache, you have come to the right place. As a mom and a nurse, I have helped many people deal with all kinds of pain including toothaches, and I have suffered through many toothaches myself. I am the type of person who likes to help others, so I decided to create this blog. In this blog, I plan to post entries on the causes of toothaches and how to alleviate toothache pain, but I also plan to explore long-term solutions such as fillings and sealants and more. I hope you enjoy reading, and I thank you for stopping by.

Tips Designed to Hasten Recovery Time After Wisdom Teeth Removal

Wisdom teeth are the third molars that are in the furthest back region of your mouth. Healthy wisdom teeth do not require removal, but when wisdom teeth become impacted or do not emerge normally, they do need to be extracted. This type of procedure is fairly common at most dental clinics, but it is important that you are aware of recovery instructions that are designed to help you speed up the amount of time that it takes you to recover fully after you undergo wisdom teeth removal.  Clot It is important that you take extra care to ensure that the blood clot that forms over the socket of the wisdom tooth that was extracted is not disturbed in any way. Moving the clot can negatively impact the healing process and lengthen recovery time. This means that you are not instructed to drink from a straw for the first few days after you have your wisdom teeth removed. The suction that is created in your mouth when you suck liquids through a straw could potentially dislodge the blood clot that is forming. In order to protect the clot that is forming, you should place gauze over the extraction site for the first few days. All strenuous activity like running and jumping should be avoided for a few days to ensure that your blood clot is not dislodged in any way through movement. Elevation It is also recommended that you prop your head up at all times. It is not suggested that you lay flat the first few days following your wisdom teeth removal. By propping up your head up, you...

Tackling Excessive Saliva While Wearing New Dentures

Having a new set of dentures fitted can be a tremendous help when it comes to being able to speak and eat properly, and they can also be a big boost to your self-esteem. However, a procedure with such far-reaching ramifications is doomed to have a few side effects, and one strange sensation a lot of new denture wearers experience is excessive salivation. Why are my dentures causing me to salivate excessively? There are a number of reasons that a new set of dentures can cause you to salivate uncontrollably, but the good news is that they are nothing to worry about and your saliva production levels should return to normal within the space of a few weeks. These reasons can include: Natural responses – As far as the body of a new denture wearer is concerned, the new false teeth lodged in its mouth is a foreign object and should either be consumed or spat out. As such, the mouth creates more saliva to facilitate either response. This autonomic response will go away in time as your body becomes accustomed to the presence of dentures. Improper fit – If your dentures do not fit snugly against the gum line, or hold your mouth in an unnatural position, they may be stimulating saliva production. Dentures that are too tall and hold the jaw open or that extend too far into the corners of the mouth are common culprits. Gum recession – Dentures cause a certain amount of gum recession as a matter of course, but if you have fragile gums, or a pre-existing condition such as diabetes that weakens the integrity of...

The Water Pick: What Is It and Do You Need One?

Most people understand that visiting the dentist on a regular basis leads to better oral hygiene. However, in order to maintain a healthy, beautiful smile, care must be taken at home, as well. While a toothbrush and dental floss are the main instruments in dental care, there are other things than can help to improve overall dental hygiene, as well. One is the water pick. What is a Water Pick? Water picks, which are often called “oral irrigators” can help to supplement your current dental care regimen. These devices are especially helpful for those who suffer from periodontal disease or those who have full-bracketed braces. A water pick utilizes small, powerful bursts of water to dislodge bacteria, food scraps and other items that have become stuck in the crevices of the mouth. Children who are currently undergoing orthodontic treatment usually find that a water pick helps them get their teeth cleaner than a toothbrush along. Using the Water Pick When the water pick is used properly, it will not only dislodge any debris or particles that may have been missed while brushing, you will also be providing a gentle massage for the gums. This helps to promote blood flow in the gums and keep them healthy. Keep in mind, while water picks are excellent to fight a number of periodontal diseases, they do not fully remove plaque, which is why it is still important to floss and brush each day, even when using the device. Beneficial for Sensitive Teeth For those who suffer from sensitive gums and teeth, flossing each day may cause discomfort. A water pick can help to...

Things that can make you stop grinding your teeth

Grinding your teeth, or bruxism, is something that affects many people throughout the world. As it is most common during the night when you are asleep, it can’t really be classified as a bad habit, as you’re not always aware that you’re doing it. This is also why it’s rather hard to cure, even if you’re seeing a dentist regularly. If you’re grinding your teeth, you should know there are some things you can do both to decrease and completely stop you from grinding your teeth. What you’re putting in your mouth during the day The first thing you should do is to mind what you are putting in your mouth during daytime. If you have a habit of chewing a lot of chewing gum during the day, this behaviour might also show during the night, causing you to clench or grind your teeth. The same thing applies if you eat a lot of hard or tough things, like steak or nuts. The jaw is just so used to the movement that it can’t stop even when you’re not chewing. Changing your diet and habits might help you get rid of bruxism. Relaxation exercises As bruxism often is a sign of stress or tension, you should get acquainted with different relaxation exercises. Reducing stress is difficult, but doing regular breathing exercises and stretching can reduce your everyday stress levels a lot. You should especially focus on stretching you neck and jaw muscles, as these are the ones affected by bruxism. Ask your dentist about appropriate stretching exercises to make sure you don’t injure yourself while stretching. You should also make...

Understanding Dental Crowns

If you want to improve your smile, you ought to consider getting dental crowns. The dental crown procedure is not as complicated as it sounds. The following will educate you on what dental crowns are, their applications and the procedure for getting them. What is a Dental Crown? This is a tooth-like cap that is similar to a tooth and used to modify the size, shape and overall appearance of your tooth. There are many different materials used to make crowns. These include stainless steel, porcelain and resin. Applications of Dental Crowns Dental crowns can be used for a variety of reasons, including the following: Prevent a weakened tooth from breaking Hold together a tooth that is cracked Restore a tooth that’s broken Cover teeth that have fillings Cover an implant Cover discoloured teeth Procedure For Getting a Dental Crown During your first visit, the dentist will take some x-rays to examine the roots of your tooth and the bone surrounding the tooth. If your tooth has decay or could get infected or injured, your dentist will first perform a root canal procedure. It involves removing the pulp and nerve of your tooth as well as cleaning the inside parts of your tooth. Your doctor will numb or anesthetize your tooth and the area surrounding the tooth. The tooth that is being treated will be filed along the sides and chewing surfaces to create space for your crown. The amount of surface that will be removed will depend on the crown you are going to get; for example, metal crowns are thin and need little tooth structure compared to...

Are You a Good Candidate for Dental Implants?

A dental implant is like a false tooth that actually screws into the gum line permanently. Dental implants can be used when you’ve lost a tooth or need to have a tooth pulled for any reason, and they can improve your appearance and allow you to talk and chew freely. They can even make your mouth safer than having a broken or chipped tooth that may cut and scrape the gums or the inside of the cheeks. If you’re not sure if a dental implant is the right choice for you, note a few considerations to discuss with your dentist. 1. Your overall health Your gum line needs to be strong enough to support a dental implant, and someone with a health condition that may affect the mouth may not be a good candidate. These conditions may include severe gum disease, uncontrolled diabetes, or oral cancer. If you are receiving radiation or are a heavy smoker or drinker, these factors too may affect your candidacy. The dental implant needs to actually fuse to the bone of the jaw to stay in place and if your health is compromised, this process may also be compromised. 2. If you may tend to neglect dentures and bridges One advantage of a dental implant is that it’s a permanent solution for tooth loss; you don’t need to take it out and clean it every day as you do dentures and bridges. Many people tend to neglect the care of their dentures and bridges and, in turn, they may suffer bad breath, an increased risk of oral infection due to a buildup of bacteria...

Forewarned Is Forearmed: Dental Developmental Stages Every Parent Needs to Know About

Maintaining the health of your teeth is something that everyone needs to be concerned about from cradle to grave. Okay, so technically very few people need to worry about their teeth while still in the cradle (unless they happen to have been born with natal teeth). But from the moment a child’s first baby teeth arrive, proper dental hygiene becomes vital. There are three major stages in a child’s dental development, and parents need to be ready to face these challenges. Fortunately, there are unlikely to be any surprises when it comes to normal dental development. But still, forewarned is forearmed! So what do parents need to be aware of when it comes to their child’s dental development? Hello Baby Teeth You should take your child to the dentist for their first checkup when their baby teeth begin to appear. This is generally when your child is between five and seven months of age. At this point, sucking on a pacifier can affect a baby’s teeth, as can excessive thumb sucking. While not necessarily detrimental to the development of your child’s teeth, they can affect the angle of growth. Your dentist will be able to tell you if this is likely to be an issue, and you can then look at methods for weaning your child off this behaviour. Your dentist will also be able to show you how to care for these emerging baby teeth, such as the best dental products for the job. Goodbye Baby Teeth At around six years of age, these baby teeth will begin to fall out of their own accord, leading to multiple...

Three Ways Your Dental Practice Can Expand to Help the Community

As a dentist you, know there is an increase in tooth decay, tooth loss, and severe dental issues. One of the contributing factors is the lack of dental care for certain demographics, such as people living below the poverty line and the elderly. You may want to expand your dental practice in order to help these various demographics. If you are just starting your research on ways to expand your dental practice, here are a few ways to consider. Mobile Dentistry One of the ways that you can expand your dental practice to help the community is to open a mobile dentistry clinic. This clinic can go to different locations and set up a dental plan during the day and take on income-based and charity based patients. Though you may not be able to do major dental work in this mobile clinic, you can still offer a basic outreach to do check-ups, x-rays, and consultations in poorer neighborhoods and other locations. You can also choose to offer a mobile dentistry clinic as a home visit option for housebound patients. Senior Partnerships Senior partnerships are ways that many dental practices are expanding their businesses to help the community. These partnerships allow the dental office to partner with various assisted-living communities as well as nursing homes. When the partnership is developed, your dental office will open up a small practice inside of an existing assisted-living community or nursing home. You can send a dentist from your office or a dental assistant to the senior partnership location. They will conduct basic check-ups, cleanings, x-rays, and take notes to bring back to you...

Cracked Tooth? What You Need To Know

Cracks in your teeth can cause pain, sensitivity to heat, cold and sweetness, and uncomfortable swelling of the gums.  Here are the answers to some common questions you may have about cracked teeth. What causes cracked teeth? Cracks in your teeth can be caused by a number of different factors.  If the fracture is in the tooth root, it could have been caused by long-standing gum disease that has weakened the jaw bone around the tooth root.  Sometimes, dental work involving very large fillings can weaken the surrounding tooth enamel so that it eventually cracks. If you have the habit of grinding your teeth while you sleep, cracks in your teeth can occur due to the tremendous pressure placed on them.  Cracking can also occur when you bite on a hard surface such as a boiled sweet.  Facial injuries and impacts can also result in cracked teeth. What does a cracked tooth look like? A simple cracked tooth is seen as a single crack running from the top edge of the tooth down to the root.  Although the tooth doesn’t split in half, the damage can extend into the inner tissues of the tooth. A common form of cracking is ‘craze lines’.  These are present in the outer enamel of the tooth and show up as minute cracks, like crazy paving.  They won’t cause you any pain, although you should still get them checked out by your dentist. A cracked ‘cusp’ usually occurs as a result of biting onto something hard.  The cusp is the pointed part of your tooth.  If it’s broken, you could experience pain when biting....

Dental Malocclusion: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment Options

Malocclusion is the improper alignment of teeth which affects dental function and the general visual appeal. This type of condition can cause serious oral discomfort as well as other dental complications when left untreated.  If you have mild or severe malocclusion, you should understand basic aspects of the condition. Here is a short description of the causes, symptoms and potential treatment procedures: Causes of Malocclusion Malocclusion is an inherited condition or trait which means that it is usually passed down along the generation line. If your family has a continuing history of the condition, you should be vigilant to ensure that any misalignment is dealt with as early as possible. There are different types of malocclusion problems so it is important to consult your dentist or an orthodontist for proper assessment and diagnosis. Common misalignment problems include overcrowding of teeth, protrusion of the front teeth in the upper dental arch and severe overlapping of the upper teeth over the lower ones. For instance, your children may be vulnerable to the issue if you have the condition so you should ensure the dentist monitors their health. There are other factors that can induce or contribute to the advancement of malocclusion. Poor health conditions such as cleft lip and palate, oral tumours, jaw injuries and poorly placed dental devices like braces, fillings and crowns can contribute to misalignment. Habits such as thumb-sucking, prolonged use of the pacifier and extended bottle-feeding in early childhood are also important factors in malocclusion. Symptoms of Malocclusion The symptoms of dental malocclusion may be severe and apparent or subtle. You should recognise the typical signs so that...